Crosstalks

The Future of our Digital commons: book launch event

Info

Date: 
3 Feb 2005

The first CROSSTALKS book “How open is the future?” was released in a co-organised day event "The Future of our Digital Commons" by CROSSTALKS and DISC and in the presence of about 60 participants coming from various universities (Solvay, KULEuven, UGent, Erasmus Hogeschool), from the industry (ICT, media) and from European, federal and regional policymakers.

Programme: 

10.00-12.15 - ROUND TABLE on The Future of Our Digital Commons


10.00: Intro by Jan Cornelis, vice-rector Vrije Universiteit Brussel & co-editor of the CROSSTALKS book, by Ph.Vincke, dean of the Faculty of Applied Sciences and president of DISC and Cécile Sztalberg, Education pool DISC
10.25: Advancing Economic Research on the FOSS Mode of Production
by J.M. Dalle - «Open Source» researcher and entrepreneur, CEO of the French n°1 public incubator Agoranov.
10.45 : Legal Aspects of Software Protection through Patents
by Bruno de Vuyst/Liv Steuts - Lawyers Lawfort & VUB associates
11.05: The Future of Software: Enabling the Marketplace to decide
by Dirk Tombeur CTO Microsoft Belux
11.25 : Creative Commons, Made in Belgium
by Melanie Carly – Centre for Intellectual Property Rights - K.U. Brussel - K.U. Leuven & Creative Commons Belgium
11.45 – 12:30: Discussion with extra panelists

Lunch at the STOA.

 

14.00-16.00 : INVITED TALK on Open Innovation


14.00 : Welcome by Pierre Van Antwerpen, Director of ABE, advisor of the Brussels Minister of Employment, Economy,Scientific Research, Fire & Medical Emergencies - Benoît CEREXHE
14.10 : “Open Innovation” - Invited talk by Jean-Michel DALLE
15.15-16.00 : Discussion, coffee & networking

Bios / Slides

Jean-Michel Dalle is an Associate Professor of economics with the University Pierre-et-Marie-Curie and a researcher with University of Dauphine (Paris, France). He is mainly concerned with the economics of innovation, and has focused since 1998 on the economics of software and open-source software. He had previously worked on technological competition, diffusion and standardization, on the economics of science, and on interaction models in economics. M. Dalle has published numerous papers in international reviews, and is a regular speaker and invited speaker in international conferences. In France, M. Dalle graduated from Ecole Polytechnique and ENSAE (master degree in statistics and economics). He holds a PhD in economics from Ecole Polytechnique (with the highest distinction). He has been previously a consultant during several years for BNP Paribas, a major European bank, and was then a cofounder and CEO of Science Pratique, a technology transfer office and incubator dedicated to projects born in research labs. He is still currently a VP for Business Development for Agoranov - http://www.agoranov.com/ - the no. 1 French "public" incubator, located in Paris.

Report

On the 3rd of February 2005, the first CROSSTALKS book “How open is the future?” was released in a co-organised day event by CROSSTALKS and DISC and in the presence of about 60 participants coming from various universities (Solvay, KULEuven, UGent, Erasmus Hogeschool), from the industry (ICT, media) and from European, federal and regional policymakers. Before noon, the lectures focused on possible future scenarios inspired by Free and Open Source Software without neglecting the possibilities and merits offered by proprietary software. Vice-rector Research and co-editor of the book, Jan Cornelis translated the FOSS issue to the dilemma of the need of a university research community and the increasing demands of society on the research results and the universities’ core tasks. Jean-Michel Dalle (Paris Dauphiné & Paris VI) elaborated on this dilemma from his double function – or as he calls it himself, the schizophrenic dualism between the researcher in him and the director of the French n°1 public incubator Agoranov.
Dirk Tombeur (CTO Microsoft Belux) stressed the importance of patents in an innovation process and as stepping stone for a business model enabling investment policy. While Bruno de Vuyst (Lawfort) sketched the history and the need of stable, yet flexible intellectual property laws, Melanie Carly (KULeuven, KUBrussel) introduced new ways of distributing creative work and protecting ownership through the Creative Commons model.

The constructive discussion that followed between the speakers and with the audience, resulted in a new and open way of thinking and discussing about collaborative projects in which on the one hand the quality of the product is envisioned and on the other hand the motivation and valorization of the creators. The panel discussion was not led into a compromise but held the promise of a brief look into a future where the best of both worlds would be combined in an more open and transparent world of researching, creating, distributing and enjoying the results.

In the afternoon Jean-Michel Dalle again held the attention of the people present in the Promotion room with his innovating and not IP directed – intellectual property – view on future economic and social research on other aspects of the open source concept. Referring regularly to the panel discussion before lunch and projecting the merits and inspiring aspects of Free and Open Source Software on major gaps that exist in the scientific research that has been done on the subject so far.