Crosstalks

#00 Kick off congress: The future of medication

Info

Date: 
13 Oct 2006
Place: 

Aula De Schelp, Flemish Parliament
Hertogsstraat 6
1011 Brussels

From 2005 until 2009, CROSSTALKS ran a bottom-up and interdisciplinary project “The Future of Medication in a Patient-centered Health Care”, a series of conferences and workshops to develop constructive dialogues between all the partners in the health care sector.

Crucial in this project was the collaborative partnership and sharing of knowledge between academics, industry, physicians, pharmacists, patients, sick funds and insurances, health and social care organizations and policymakers.

Programme: 
08:30 - 09:00 Coffee and registration
09:00 - 09:05 Opening Remarks by Marleen
Wynants
(Operational Director CROSSTALKS)
& Alain
Dupont
(Vice-dean Research Faculty of
Medicine & Pharmacy, Vrije Universiteit Brussel)

Welcome by Benjamin
Van Camp
(Rector Vrije Universiteit
Brussel)
09:05 - 09:35 Introductory talk by Marc
De Vos
(Ugent & Itinera Institute)


Health care policy in 21st century Belgium: a new paradigm?
 

Morning Session

Chair: Minne Casteels (KUL) and André
Scheen
(ULiège)

  Topic 1 | Investing in the
future
09:45 - 10:25
1. Re-considering the life cycle of medication: the Tropical
Disease Institute - a case from the open drug development
context by Marc A Marti-Renom
(Bioinformatics Department, Prince Felipe Research Center,
Valencia, Spain)
10:25 - 11:10
2. Current approaches in European
health care policy – What models can balance the
needs of payers and industry? by Philippe
Brunet
(Deputy Head of Cabinet DG Health and Consumer
Protection, European Commission)
11:10 - 11:40 Coffee
  Topic 2 | Socio-economic
impact of the existing model
11:40 - 12:20

1. Corporate: How can we enhance life with medication?
What kind of products can we produce? What is Their
added value? How can we deliver quality and pursue innovation
when the current R&D model is no longer sustainable?
And where does the funding come from?

by Dominique Limet (Senior Vice-President
GSK- Area Director Southern and Eastern Europe)

12:20 - 13:00

2. Societal Quality Debate: The future of health care
is patient-centred. What kind of medication and care
does society need? Why should policymakers and not the
industry decide what is necessary? What are the EU challenges
to safeguard quality of medication and care and patient
safety by Joeri Guillaume
(Research Center of Socialist Mutualities)

13:00 - 14:15

Walking Lunch

 

Afternoon session

Chairs:
Jean-Marie Boeynaems (ULB) & Alain
Dupont
(VUB)

  Topic 3 | Evaluation of
the added value of medication
14:15 - 14:55 1. Health Technology Assessment:
Medical technology should offer an added value to society
that is affordable. How do society, policymakers and health
assurances deal with promising innovative technology with
a limited proof of performance and safety? by Dirk
Ramaekers
(National Knowledge Center for Health Care)
14.55 - 15:35

2. Economic Assessment: What is the added value of
the existing model? How to assess whether a new drug is
value for money? What are the revenues? What about the
tension between the added value and the extra costs?
by Lieven Annemans (Health Economist,
Ugent/VUB)

15:35 - 16:15

3. An ethician's Christmas
list concerning medication – Supply and demand by
Max Baumann (Dialog Ethik, Switzerland)

16:15 - 16:45

Coffee

 

Topic 4
| The future of health care

16:45 -17.25 1. The Future of Health Care - A Global Perspective. Considering
both the developing AND the developed world perspective,
and focusing on generic issues of common interest and issues
related to medicines relevant for both developing and developed
countries (e.g. diabetes which is no longer just a rich
country disease and issues related to women's health which
affect rich and poor alike) by Tikki
Pang
(Director Research Policy & Cooperation (RPC/EIP),
World Health Organization)
17:25 - 18:15

2. Closing Talk: The Future of Medication
– Thought-provoking and strategic perspectives:
Where do we invest as society? What is the added value
for society? What are the choices that will have to be
made at political, social and individual level? What’s
the responsibility of the pharma industry and what’s
the return? How can a true partnership between policymakers,
research and industry be established? by David
Byrne
, Former EU Health Commissioner, Chair of ERC
- Ethics Review Committee (Lyon), Member of eminent pharma
thinktanks and health organisations

18:15 - 19:30 Open discussions - Reception & Networking

Bios / Slides

Benjamin Van Camp

[bio] Professor Dr. Benjamin Van Camp is the rector of Vrije Universiteit Brussel since 2001. He is Professor of Hematology and Immunology at Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Director of Research Unit Hematology/Immunology, Head of the Blood Transfusion Center Jette and Head of the Clinical Department of Medical Oncology and Hematology, Academic Hospital. He graduated magna cum laude from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel in 1971, and earned a Ph.D. in 1979. He spent several years abroad working at University of California, San Diego, Stanford University; Division of Oncology, University of Nebraska, and he worked with the IMF's chairman, Dr. Brian G.M. Durie, at both The University of Arizona; Division of Clinical Hematology, in Tucson Arizona as well as at the University of London. Dr. Van Camp has held numerous appointments including President of the Belgian Hematological Society, and the Belgian Immunological Society and is currently President of the International Crythropoietim Advisory Board, and is a Scientific Advisor to the International Myeloma Foundation.

Marc De Vos

[topic] Health care policy in 21st century Belgium: a new paradigm? Current and future challenges for the Belgian health care system in a larger societal context. Medical-social SWOT analysis with a particular perspective on medication and patients.

[bio] Marc De Vos holds a Licentiate and Doctorate in Law (Universiteit Gent), a Master in Social Law (Université Libre de Bruxelles), and a Master of Laws (Harvard University). He teaches Belgian, European and international employment and labor law, as well as American law, at Ghent University and the University of Brussels (VUB). He is the present general director of the Itinera Institute, an independent and non-partisan think-tank and do-tank that, operating beyond political parties, regional differences and interest groups, seeks to identify roads for policy reform towards sustained economic growth and social protection, for Belgium and its regions. A member of the Brussels’ bar, at Lontings & Partners, he is the author of several books and over one hundred scientific articles. He frequently publishes, lectures and debates on issues of labor and employment law, European integration, labor market reform, pensions, health care and the welfare state, both nationally and internationally, and in academic, professional and policy circles, as well as in the media.

André Scheen

[bio] André Scheen, MD, obtained his PhD in Clinical Sciences in 1983 at the University of Liège, where he is since 2002 Professor in Medicine, Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics. From 2000 untill present he has been Head of the Division of Diabetes, Nutrition & Metabolic Disorders and Division of General Internal Medicine. He is member of various scientific societies, such as Académie Royale de Médecine de Belgique, Commission de Remboursement des Médicaments, Ministery of Public Health, Belgium and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and of Obesity (EASO). He has been developing editorial activities for medical journals such as “Diabetes & Metabolism" and the "Revue Médicale de Liège" and has been a referee for numerous journals in the field of Diabetes, Metabolic Disorders, Internal Medicine and Clinical Pharmacolog. He contributed to more than 350 international original papers and 250 national publications in the main research areas of exercise physiology, insulin secretion/sensitivity assessment, obesity, diabetes mellitus, lipids, endocrine chronobiology, randomised clinical trials, therapeutics, evidence-based medicine, …He has been involved in randomised clinical trials (phases 1, 2, 3, and 4) for more than 25 years (in collaboration with A.T.C. since they began) and holds the G.C.P. Certificate for Investigators, Brookwood International Academy of Healthcare Research (1997).

Minne Casteels

[bio] Minne Casteels, MD, PhD, is professor at the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, where she teaches pharmacology. Her research focuses on peroxisomal diseases and lipid biochemistry. Since early 2006, Minne Casteels is assigned as President of the CTG, “Commissie Tegemoetkoming van Geneesmiddelen”, which plays a key role in shaping social policy with regard to access to health care, as it represents delegates from all stakeholders such as mutualities, universities, pharmaceutical industry, various ministerial cabinets, doctors and pharmacists. She is currently a member of the Scientific Advice Working Party (SAWP) of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA).


Marc A Marti-Renom

[topic] The Tropical Disease Initiative - a case from the open drug development context

During the last decade, the number of novel targets for drug discovery has decayed resulting in very few novel therapeutics approved by the US FDA. In this presentation, I will introduce an “open source” approach to drug development, called the Tropical Diseases Initiative (TDI). We hope that TDI, a decentralized, Web-based, community-wide effort, may became one of the solutions to the problem by empowering scientists from laboratories, universities, institutes, and corporations to work together for a common cause. http://www.tropicaldisease.org

[bio] Marc A. Marti-Renom is a computational biologist and head of the Structural Genomics Unit of the Bioinformatics Department, Prince Felipe Research Center. He conducts research on the improvement of the accuracy of protein 3D models focusing on sequence-structure alignment methods. He has been involved in the development and design of a database of sequence and structure alignments DBAli. He is a founding member of the Tropical Disease Initiative. Using an open-source research and development model, the Tropical Disease Initiative seeks cures for tropical - "orphan" -illnesses such as malaria dengue fever and African sleeping sickness. TDI aspires to combine the efforts of hundreds of volunteer researchers from around the globe, focusing on the application of computational biology and chemistry on drug discovery. Relying on a distributed, collaborative, transparent process of biomedical development, this bottom-up approach might take on health challenges that pharmaceutical corporations have determined to be unprofitable.

Philippe Brunet

[topic] Current approaches in European health care policy – What models can balance the needs of payers and industry?

[bio] Philippe Brunet was born in 1959 in Cahors (France). Doctor in Medicine (MD) and Iuris Doctor in Community Law (LLD), he entered the Commission in 1988 (DG V - Social Affairs) to work on “Health and Safety at the workplace” issues and other legal questions concerning working conditions. In 1992 Philippe Brunet joined the Public Health Unit in the same DG. He moved to DG III (Industry) in 1993 in order to prepare the establishment of the EMEA (European Medicines Evaluation Agency) and complete the legal framework of the Community authorisation scheme for medicinal products. From 1995 to 1998, he was in charge the major legal aspects of the pharmaceutical sector. This included mainly industrial and intellectual property, parallel imports issues, complaints and infringement procedures and the decision-making process for the marketing authorisations of medicinal products. Philippe Brunet was appointed deputy Head of Unit “Pharmaceuticals and Cosmetics Unit - DG Enterprise” in 1998, and Head of the Unit “Pharmaceuticals, legislative framework and market authorisations” in April 2000. In November 2004 Philippe Brunet joined the Cabinet of Markos Kyprianou, the European Commissioner responsible for Health and Consumer protection, as Deputy Head of Cabinet.

Dominique Limet

[abstract] Corporate: How can we enhance life with medication? What kind of products can we produce? What is their added value? How can we deliver quality and pursue innovation when the current R&D model is no longer sustainable? And where does the funding come from?

[bio] Dominique Limet is responsible for GlaxoSmithKline operations within Southern & Eastern Europe and is based at the company’s corporate headquarters in Brentford, UK. After joining GlaxoWellcome in September 1996 as Marketing and Sales Director for France, Dominique served as General Manager of Operations continuing onto General Manager of GlaxoWellcome France. Following the merger of SmithKline Beecham and GlaxoWellcome in December 2000, he was appointed General Manager of GlaxoSmithKline France. Prior to GlaxoWellcome, Dr Limet worked for Ciba-Geigy’s business. During 11 years, he held various marketing and management positions, including at headquarters in Switzerland. In 1985, he joined the French Pharma Division as Product Manager, became Group Product Manager (1985), moved to Basel as International Product Manager (1989), then became Head of Marketing & Sales back in France (1991-1996), position he held before joining GlaxoWellcome. Dr Limet holds a Doctorate in Medicine, a specialisation in Occupational Medicine and a Marketing and Management Program earned at Insead.

Joeri Guillaume

[abstract] Societal Quality Debate: The future of health care is patient-centred. What kind of medication and care does society need? Why should policymakers and not the industry decide what is necessary? What are the EU challenges to safeguard quality of medication and care and patient safety?

[bio] Joeri Guillaume is staff member of the study department of the socialist mutualities. He is in charge of the files concerning the Intermutualistic Agency (IMA), a joint venture of the sickness funds that gathers, analyses and incorporates data of the sickness funds into policymaking information for the government. In this quality he is frequently in touch with the Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre that regularly appeals to the expertise and data of IMA for its research. He also is engaged in the hospital policy and general strategy and in particular in the growing impact of European rules on the functioning of the sickness funds and the European Health Care Systems in general. Before joining the socialist sickness funds in 2003, Joeri Guillaume was employed at the study department of the independent sickness funds, 7 years of which he was head of this department. Joeri Guillaume graduated in 1991 as a commercial engineer at the ULB and is currently studying law at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel.

Jean-Marie Boeynaems

[bio] Jean-Marie BOEYNAEMS, M.D, holds a PhD in biochemistry and pharmacology and is currently Director of the Department of Clinical Pathology at Erasme academic Hospital. He is also professor of pharmacology at the ULB and director of the PHARMED course in pharmaceutical medicine.

Alain Dupont

[bio] Alain Dupont is vice-dean Research and Head of the Pharmacology Department at the Faculty of Medicine and Pharmacy of Vrije Universiteit Brussel. His department is mainly developing research activities in the domain of Neuro-immuno-endocrinology. He is President of the Accompanying Committee of “The Future of Medication” project.

Dirk Ramaekers

[abstract] Health Technology Assessment: Medical technology should offer an added value to society that is affordable. How do society, policymakers and health assurances deal with promising innovative technology with a limited proof of performance and safety?

[bio] Dirk Ramaekers, MD, obtained a PhD in pharmacology and specialized in general intestinal medicine. He is a specialist in hospital management and in medical data management. At KULeuven, he teaches evidence-based health care. Currently he is General Director of the Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre.

Lieven Annemans

[abstract] Economic Assessment: What is the added value of the existing model? What are the revenues? How can the model be improved? What about the tension between the added value and the extra budgetary impact of medical technologies?

[bio] Lieven Annemans is a health economist, senior consultant in IMS Health and Professor of Health Economics at Ghent University and the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. He is Past-President of ISPOR, the International Society for PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes Research, and chairman of the Flemish Health Council. He has experience in health economic evaluations in > 20 countries, and in many therapeutic areas. His educational record includes a Master’s degree in Physical Education, a Master’s degree in Management, both from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, a Degree of Commercial Engineer from the Solvay School of Business Economics at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, a certificate in Health Economics from the University of Antwerp, and a PhD in Economics from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. His main interests are epidemiological models, early new technology assessment, retrospective/prospective health economic evaluations and willingness to pay assessments.

Max Baumann

[abstract] An Ethician's Christmas list concerning Medication – Supply and Demand

The supply of medical drugs is primarily governed by commercial laws, which match only partially with the needs of patients. Ethically acceptable solutions, to bridge this gap, cannot be found unless we become aware of all of its extensions.
European Health Care systems are not at all patient-centered. Patients – as a very hetereogenous group - are not the main players in this game, against any differing pretentions. Medication (more than other services in health care) is primarily governed by commercial laws. Suppliers follow (and have to do so) the laws of the market, which are not necessarily congruent to the existential needs of patients. Supply and demand of pediatric drugs may serve as a striking example for this gap.
The ethician's Christmas list therefore begins with a plea for an open exposition of roles and goals of all players in this game, which is a precondition for the negotiation of fair solutions concerning the ethically difficult questions with which we all are confronted.

[bio] Max Baumann (born 1951) is co-founder and member of the Board of Dialog Ethik (Interdisciplinary Institute for Health Care Ethics/Zurich) and Member of the Swiss Federal Commission for Basic Issues of the Health Insurance System. He is an Attorney-at-Law; Dr. iur. and Professor for Philosophy / Theory of Law and Civil Law (University of Zurich, Switzerland). His latest publications concerning health care issues are „Vorsorgeauftrag für medizinische Massnahmen und Patientenverfügung (ZVW 2005/2, 58ff) and „Recht?Ethik?Medizin / Eine Einführung ins juristische Denken – nicht nur für Ethiker und Mediziner, Peter Lang Verlag, Bern etc., 2005“.

Tikki Pangestu

[abstract] The Future of Health Care - A Global Perspective. The future of healthcare depends not only on the development of new and improved interventions but also in ensuring equitable access to such interventions to those who are most in need. Challenges to healthcare delivery will be considered from both the developing and the developed world perspective, and in the context of both the healthcare delivery system and the central role of health research. It will put forward the thesis that efficient, effective and equitable global healthcare delivery in the future will depend on constructive dialogue and innovative partnerships between the key players (industry, governments, academia, consumers-patients, development agencies and international organizations).

[bio] Tikki Pangestu is presently Director of the Research Policy & Cooperation Department of the World Health Organization in Geneva. He holds a BSc (Hons) degree in biochemistry and a PhD in immunology from the Australian National University in Canberra, Australia. He was previously Professor of Biomedical Sciences, Institute of Postgraduate Studies & Research, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and Editor-in-Chief & Publisher of the Asia Pacific Journal of Molecular Biology & Biotechnology. His professional accreditations include FRCPath (Fellow, Royal College of Pathologists, United Kingdom), FIBiol (Fellow, Institute of Biology, United Kingdom), FAAM (Fellow, American Academy of Microbiology, U.S.A.), FAMM (Fellow, Academy of Medicine of Malaysia); Fellow, Academy of Science of the Developing World; Member, International Molecular Biology Network (IMBN). Research and academic interests include prevention and control of infectious diseases, development of research capabilities in developing countries, assessment of health research system performance, evidence to policy linkages, impact and application of modern biotechnology on developing economies.

David Byrne

[abstract] Closing Talk: The Future of Medication – Thought-provoking and strategic perspectives: Where do we invest as society? What is the added value for society? What are the choices that will have to be made at political, social and individual level? What’s the responsibility of the pharma industry and what’s the return? How can a true partnership between policymakers, research and industry be established?

[bio] David Byrne (Born 1947) is an Irish senior counsel, former Attorney-General and former EU Commissioner. Byrne was educated at Newbridge College, Co. Kildare, University College Dublin and King's Inns, Dublin. He was called to the Bar in 1970 and practised law in the Irish and European Courts. During his student days in Dublin, he founded the Free Legal Advice Centres, a student run organisation providing legal aid to citizens in association with the legal profession. In 1997 he became Attorney-General to the Fianna Fáil-Progressive Democrat coalition government. He was nominated to the European Commission in 1999, serving as Commissioner with responsibility for Health & Consumer Protection. After he completed his term as an EU Commissioner, he worked as a special envoy for the WHO for a six- month period. The former Attorney General's job as WHO special envoy was to provide political impetus to the revision of the international health regulations which widened their scope to cover all public health emergencies. Currently David Byrne is adjunct Professor of Law at University College Dublin. He also chairs the Ethical Review Committee of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and is a member of various think tanks on the future of the pharmaceutical industry.

Marleen Wynants

[bio] Marleen Wynants (Brussels, Belgium) is an independent content producer and the operational director of CROSSTALKS, the university and industry network of Vrije Universiteit Brussel. She holds a master in Philology and one in Audio-Visual Communication Media (KULeuven) and worked for the official Belgian Radio and Television in its pre-commercial stage. Writing as a freelance journalist on art and music, she was the main editor of the post-punt magazine Fabiola, leaving the scene in 1988, the year that Hillel Slovak, Chet Baker, Divine, Sylvester and Roy Orbison died. At present she is editorial advisor and reporter for <H>art and JANUS Magazine and member of the board of the Contemporary Music Ensemble Ictus.
Through her company Nux Publica, she has produced print and online content for the major media groups in Belgium, published books for children and a large number of essays on the impact of ICT technology on education and society. In recent years, she has reoriented her focus on communicating about interdisciplinary artistic and scientific projects, the people behind them and the creativity and innovative perspectives emerging from it. As CROSSTALKS director, she initiates series of cross-disciplinary seminars, workshops and exclusive science & industry lunches on probing issues as Open Source Software, Early Warning Information Systems, Brave New Interfaces and the Future of Medication.

Report

On Friday, 13th of October, the first CROSSTALKS congress about the
Future of Medication was launched in the Flemish Parliament. The one-day
conference is the first in a row of three and is initiated by
CROSSTALKS, Vrije Universiteit Brussel’s university and industry
network, aiming at setting-up confronting but constructive dialogues on
probing issues in society. Every theme that’s been tackled by the
network is supported and co-directed by an accompanying committee, for
the occasion chaired by VUB professor Alain Dupont, and seating
academic, industrial and governmental policy makers from the Belgian
health care arena. Such as Guy Mannaerts, ex-chairman of the University
Hospitals of KULeuven, Marc Bogaert, Professor Emeritus UGent, Herman
Meulemans of UA, Jean-Paul Degaute, president of the drug commission,
Guy Peeters, national secretary of the Socialist Mutualities, Johan van
Calster, Director-General of the national DG of Medicine and delegates
from Belgium’s most prominent pharmaceutical companies; UCB,
GlaxoSmithKline, Janssen Pharmaceutica, Astra Zeneca Foundation and
Pfizer.



The CROSSTALKS sessions do not aim at tailor-made answers but preferably
focus on getting the right questions asked on the right moment.
Therefore CROSSTALKS decisively opts for an interdisciplinary bottom-up
approach, since “open and sustainable long-term perspectives don’t allow
for short-cuts”, as stated by CROSSTALKS’ operational director Marleen
Wynants.



The CROSSTALKS concept is fueled by the unconditional donations of its
structural partners and the engagement of all possible stakeholders
within the national health care framework. Entitled “Exploring the Added
Value of Medication” this first congress provided a platform for a
multitude of perspectives addressing medication in all its aspects...

 

Open this document Read full report (ENG)

Open this document Het volledige verslag (NL)

Partners

This project could be realized due to unconditional grants by

Astra Zeneca Foundation
GlaxoSmithKline
Janssen Pharmaceutica
Pfizer
UCB